I was raised in Toronto, Canada in the first 1970s. That today My youthful self could have been utterly stunned, obesity has become an increasing, unstoppable global sensation. At that right time, there were serious Malthusian concerns that the world’s populace would soon eclipse the world’s food creation and we would face mass hunger. The major environmental concern was global cooling due to the representation of sunshine off dust particles in the air triggering the dawn of a fresh Ice Age.

Instead, some 50 years later, we find ourselves facing the opposite problems exactly. Global cooling has ceased to be always a serious concern long, but global warming and melting polar ice caps dominate the news. Instead of global craving for food and mass starvation, we face an obesity epidemic, unprecedented in human history.

There are numerous puzzling aspects to the obesity epidemic. First, what triggered it? The fact that epidemic is both global and relatively recent argues against an underlying hereditary defect. Exercise as a leisure activity was unusual in the 1970s generally. People just didn’t sweat with the oldies for the reason that decade.

The proliferation of gyms, operating clubs, exercise studios, and the like were a product of the 1980s. I would struggle with this question for quite some time. People ate white bread, snow Oreo, and cream cookies in the 1970s. Whole wheat grains pasta and bread didn’t truly exist as real foods people ate.

Second, why were we powerless to stop this epidemic? Nobody wanted to be excess fat. Best wishes scientists, doctors, and dietitians of the era were giving dietary advice to stay low fat. To get more than thirty years, doctors have recommended a low-fat, calorie-reduced diet as the treatment of choice for obesity. Yet the weight problems epidemic accelerated.

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From 1985 to 2011, the prevalence of obesity in Canada has tripled, from 6 percent to 18 percent.1All the available evidence shows that people were wanting to cut their calories, cut their unwanted fat and exercise more. However they weren’t losing weight. The only logical answer is that we didn’t understand the problem.

Eating too much extra fat and too many calories wasn’t the problem, so cutting the excess fat and calories was not the answer. So, it all comes to that first essential question back. What causes putting on weight? In the 1990s, I graduated from the University of Toronto and the University of California, LA as a kidney and physician specialist. And I have to confess that I did not have the slightest desire for the treating obesity. Not during medical school, residency, niche training, or during practice even. Nonetheless it wasn’t just me.

This was true for just about every physician trained in North America. Medical school taught us nothing about nutrition virtually and less about the treating weight problems even. There were countless hours of lectures focused on the correct medications and surgery to prescribe. I was experienced in the utilization of a huge selection of medications.

I was proficient in the utilization of dialysis. I knew about operative indications and treatments. But I knew nothing about nutrition and even less about how exactly to lose excess weight. This is regardless of the known reality that the weight problems epidemic was well established, and the epidemic of type 2 diabetes was pursuing behind just, with all its health implications. Doctors just didn’t value diet.